JGU FACES. People in portrait

Angelika Schulz-Parthu (photo: Uwe Feuerbach) GUTENBERG ALUMNI

A small publisher with a varied program

Angelika Schulz-Parthu is the owner of the quite unique and very successful Leinpfad Verlag publishing house. Among her extensive publishing program are cookbooks, city guidebooks, crime novels set in the region, and much, much more. She discovered the world of literature in the 1970s while at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). The former German Studies student is still well aware of how much she owes to her time here.


Chris Bremus (photo: Peter Pulkowski) GUTENBERG ALUMNI

Alumnus memories meet the new School of Music

Chris Bremus is a successful film composer. One important step to this career was his education at the School of Music of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). Years later, the 37-year-old has returned to the campus to talk about his time at university, about movies, commercials, and about how lucky he has been


Necati Benli, State Migration Officer of the Hesse State Police, is currently working towards his doctorate at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. (photo: Peter Pulkowski) GUTENBERG ALUMNI

Integration in practice and in theory

He never actually intended to go to university. After graduating from high school, Necati Benli preferred to join the Hesse State Police. However, in a roundabout way, this brought him eventually to Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). The president of police, Benli's superior, needed someone with specialist insight into Islam and its practices and wanted to use theory in order to underpin police procedure. And so he made Benli an unusual proposal.


Mahmoud Hassanein has translated "Das Sams" into Arabic. (photo: Britta Hoff) TRANSLATION

The Sams learns Arabic

Last year, the Goethe Institute awarded its German-Arabic Translation Prize in the Young Translators category to Mahmoud Hassanein, a doctoral candidate at the Faculty of Translation Studies, Linguistics, and Cultural Studies of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germersheim. Here he talks about his work, about literature, and about cultures.


Professor Dmitry Budker (photo: Stefan F. Sämmer) RESEARCH COOPERATION

Not everything in the universe is symmetrical

Research into fundamental symmetries and a unique nationwide cooperation between Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Helmholtz Association have brought Professor Dmitry Budker to Mainz. He will be heading up the Matter Antimatter Symmetry section at the JGU-based Helmholtz Institute Mainz, which collaborates with the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt.


Professor Tamara Grcic (photo: Stefan F. Sämmer) MAINZ ACADEMY OF ARTS

"The aim is to have everybody find their own voice"

The Academy of Arts of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) welcomes an acclaimed artist as a professor in the person of Tamara Grcic. The idea is that the versatility of her work will be reflected in her teaching. In her sculpture class, for instance, Grcic does not plan to lay down hard and fast rules but to allow students sufficient space in which to find their own personal form of artistic expression.


Professor Dagmar von Hoff (photo: Peter Pulkowski) EUROPEAN RESEARCH NETWORK

"What we are doing is 'reading' violence"

What can literature and film, what can the various media do to help uncover the structures underlying violence? This is the focus of research being undertaken by a network of German Studies scholars, among whom is Professor Dagmar von Hoff of the German Department at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). She believes that German Studies as a discipline needs to take a more international, intercultural, and intermedial approach.


Professor Krishnaraj Rajalingam (photo: Stefan F. Sämmer) HEISENBERG PROFESSORSHIP

What happens in cells

In the person of Krishnaraj Rajalingam, the Research Center for Immunotherapy of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has been very lucky to acquire one of the world's foremost cell biologists. The newly appointed Heisenberg Professor focuses on the molecular signal pathways that regulate a wide variety of different processes within cells. He investigates not only the causes of cell growth and cell differentiation but also the pathogenesis of tumors and cancer and thus supplies concepts for new treatment approaches.


Dr. Sigrid Rieuwerts (photo: Peter Pulkowski) JGU INTERNATIONAL

An advocate of German in Scotland

She founded the Society for Scottish Studies in Europe and is the head of the largest Sir Walter Scott research program. She acts as an advisor to the Scottish Parliament and set up an internship program that brings students of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) to Scottish schools. It is remarkable what Dr. Sigrid Rieuwerts has already achieved in terms of promoting the relationship between Germany and Scotland.


Professor Carola Lentz (photo: Stefan F. Sämmer)ANTHROPOLOGY

Anthropologist from Mainz becomes a Ghanaian chief

It was the first time that the title of "maalu naa" had been awarded in Nandom, in Ghana’s Upper West Region – and it was bestowed on Professor Carola Lentz from the Department of Anthropology and African Studies at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). The title makes her a kind of chief, or, to be more precise, a "development chief" of a district that encompasses some 100 settlements with around 50,000 inhabitants.


Dr. Bianca Navarro-Crummenauer (photo: Stefan F. Sämmer)FORENSIC OUTPATIENT CLINIC

"This child's death could have been prevented"

Fifteen years ago, a young physician started thinking about how she could better help abused and mistreated children. Now that physician, Dr. Bianca Navarro-Crummenauer, is in charge of the Forensic Outpatient Clinic for Victims of Domestic Violence at the Institute of Legal Medicine at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). Some 500 cases a year keep her busy.


Professor Dr. Stephan Goertz (photo: Stefan F. Sämmer)MORAL THEOLOGY

The Catholic Church under fire

The Catholic Church seems to be constantly in the headlines, but for all the wrong reasons. The controversies surrounding the morning-after pill, child abuse, and the employment rights of those working for the church are making waves. The atmosphere has become so charged that the situation is becoming increasingly radicalized. Professor Dr. Stephan Goertz, holder of the Chair of Moral Theology at the Faculty of Catholic Theology at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), has taken a stand.


Dr. Dr. Ilkan Ilhilic (photo: Peter Pulkowski)MEDICINE AND PHILOSOPHY

A Muslim, Turk, and Mainz resident on the German Ethics Council

His appointment has caused quite a stir: Dr. Dr. Ilhan Ilkilic of the Institute of the History, Philosophy, and Ethics of Medicine at the Mainz University Medical Center is the first Muslim on the German Ethics Council. In this capacity, he views himself as an intermediary between cultures and academic disciplines.


(photo: Peter Pulkowski)SPORTS SCIENCE

The Olympic spirit has a home in Mainz

Professor Dr. Norbert Müller has played an important role in forming the modern image of the Olympics. He advises the International Olympic Committee in various posts, is initiating new projects, and has always been a passionate defender of the Olympic ideal, which he considers more important than all the medals.


(photo: Peter Pulkowski)SOCIAL MEDIA

Privacy is just an illusion

From party photos to relationship status to sexual orientation – self-disclosure in the social web has become part of our everyday lives. But, users rarely make distinctions between good friends, acquaintances or workmates when posting private information. As a result, the 'private sphere' is disappearing. Dr. Leonard Reinecke, Junior Professor at the Institute of Media and Communication Studies at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), has been looking closely at this trend; how are users of social network platforms like Facebook dealing with this problem of self-disclosure and the protection of their private sphere?


(photo: Peter Pulkowski)ARS LEGENDI PRIZE 2012

One man gets excited about tiresome teaching

Mass universities need to place greater emphasis on teaching, says Dr. Malte Persike from the Institute of Psychology at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). He has just been awarded the Ars legendi Prize for Excellence in University Teaching from the German Rectors' Conference and the Donors' Association for the Promotion of Sciences and Humanities in Germany – even though he teaches a subject that most of his students dread: Psychological methodology


(photo: Peter Pulkowski)BIOLOGY

A molecule folds itself into a solar sail

Professor Dr. Harald Paulsen and his team are researching the characteristics of the light-harvesting protein LHCII. The protein and its unusual self-organization skills have fascinated biologists for twenty years. It plays an important role in photosynthesis and may one day majorly increase the efficiency of solar cells.


(photo: private)SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Straight from university to the opera stage

In 1988, the famous mezzo-soprano Claudia Eder brought a breath of fresh air to the School of Music at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). Appointed to a professorship, the singer was able to combine study and practice in a unique way. Her concept continues to be very successful and she now has many imitators.


(photo: Peter Pulkowski)NATIVE AND INDIGENOUS STUDIES

Winnetou under scrutiny

Professor Dr. Mita Banerjee's research focuses on indigenous peoples. She studies how Maori, Inuits, Aborigines, and American Indians live in contemporary society. The North American Studies specialist challenges stereotypes and combines diverse academic disciplines in her projects.


(photo: Stefan F. Sämmer)DOPING IN MASS SPORTS

Drugs testing is only a band-aid

Professor Dr. Dr. Perikles Simon has caused a stir with his method for detecting gene doping: He and his colleagues have succeeded in doing what was previously thought impossible. When it comes to headlines, this kind of research is exactly what the media love. However, in an interview, the head of the Sports Medicine, Prevention and Rehabilitation division at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) tends to take a rather different view.


(photo: Peter Pulkowski)TRANSLATION STUDIES

The trials of becoming a good interpreter

Dörte Andres is Professor of Translation Studies at  the Germersheim location of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). Her field of research is still young and the professorship she holds was created only a short time ago. She talks about the challenges presented by the course and about the many facets of her subject.


(photo: Stefan F. Sämmer)HISTORICAL LINGUISTICS

The landscape of surnames

As Professor of Historical Linguistics at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), Damaris Nübling's special interest is the development of the German language from its first documented form as Old High German, dating to around 800 AD, to contemporary German. Her current projects are witness to the fact that historical linguistics is actually anything but a drab and dry-as-dust discipline. Currently she is investigating the morphology of surnames in Germany.  


(photo: Stefan F. Sämmer)PARTICLE PHYSICS

Higgs boson electrifies Mainz physicists

Matthias Neubert and his team are elated since scientists at Geneva's CERN research center found the first indications of the existence of the Higgs boson. This is the last building block missing from the standard model of physics. The head of the Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics unit at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) now expects his area of research to take off.


(photo: Stefan F. Sämmer)DIAGNOSTICS

Evaluating cirrhosis 'live' and accurately at the cellular level

Detlef Schuppan and his colleagues are developing a revolutionary method that will make it possible to evaluate the progress of fibrosis and cirrhosis at the cellular level and to even view the effects. For this work, the physician and chemist has been awarded the most highly endowed research grant of the European Union, the ERC Advanced Grant.


(photo: Peter Pulkowski)ECONOMIC EXPERTISE

The euro area needs a redemption pact

Beatrice Weder di Mauro presented the Annual Report of the five-member German Council of Economic Experts at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). This council, which has included Weder di Mauro since 2004, is suggesting a redemption pact for the euro area as a way out of the current crisis.